News Videos

Home
Haunted House Webcam
Graveyard Webcam
Animal Ghost Webcam
Ghost Picture Collection
Submitted Pictures
Haunted Castles
Haunted Houses
Ghost of Elvis
Real or Fake Ghosts
Church Ghosts
Graveyard Ghosts
Orb Pictures
Ectoplasm Pictures

Most haunted Australia

Most haunted Canada

Most haunted England

Most haunted France

Most haunted Italy

Most haunted Jamaica

Most haunted Japan

Most haunted Scotland

Most haunted USA

Most haunted Wales

Postcard Ghosts
Haunted Places USE
Haunted Places UK
Ghost News Stories
Paranormal Terms
Paranormal Quotations
Ghost Jokes
Ghost Poems
Ghost Stories
True Ghost Stories
Short Ghost Stories
Spooky Ghost Stories
Scary Ghost Stories
Real Ghost Stories

Creepy Ghost Stories

Do you believe in ghosts?
Paranormal Links
 

Aesopís Fables

Fun & Games

Advertise Here

Amusement

Best Baby Names

Christmas Jokes

College Humor

Complete Nonsense

Fairy Tales

Famous Poems

Famous Quotes

Flowers

Framed Posters

Free Diet Plans

Free Song Lyrics

Free View Webcams

Friendship Quotes

Funny Cat Pictures

Funny Cats

Funny Jokes

Funny Jokes Online

Funny Pictures

Funny Poems

Funny Quotes

Ghosts

Ghost Pictures

Ghost Stories

Glaswegian

Healthy Recipes

Humorous Scripts

Humor Posters

Inspirational Poems

Insult Generator

Jokes

Knock Knock Jokes

Lighthouses

Limerick Poems

Limericks

Love Poems

Fantasy Books

Mockery

Model Posters

Movie Posters

Names Meanings

Rabbie Burns

Not Mensa

Photographs

Poet

Poker Articles

Posters

Quotations Online

Random Words

Riddles

Riddles Online

Odd Jokes

Spam

Sports Posters

Duck Webcam

Strange Laws

Stupid Laws

Tongue Twisters

Top 100 Baby Names

Webmaster Articles

Weird Facts

Weird Websites

Weird

Wine

Work From Home

Worst City

Worst Jokes

ghost stories
Scary and exciting Ghost Stories from around the World . . .
 

Ghost Story Title : The Signalman Part-6 by Charles Dickens

 

Ghost Story:

A change in his time of duty would come round next night, he had apprised me, and he would be off an hour or two after sunrise, and on again soon after sunset. I had appointed to return accordingly.

Next evening was a lovely evening, and I walked out early to enjoy it. The sun was not yet quite down when I traversed the field-path near the top of the deep cutting. I would extend my walk for an hour, I said to myself, half an hour on and half an hour back, and it would then be time to go to my signal-man's box.

Before pursuing my stroll, I stepped to the brink, and mechanically looked down, from the point from which I had first seen him. I cannot describe the thrill that seized upon me, when, close at the mouth of the tunnel, I saw the appearance of a man, with his left sleeve across his eyes, passionately waving his right arm.

The nameless horror that oppressed me passed in a moment, for in a moment I saw that this appearance of a man was a man indeed, and that there was a little group of other men, standing at a short distance, to whom he seemed to be rehearsing the gesture he made. The Danger-light was not yet lighted. Against its shaft, a little low hut, entirely new to me, had been made of some wooden supports and tarpaulin. It looked no bigger than a bed.

With an irresistible sense that something was wrong,--with a flashing self-reproachful fear that fatal mischief had come of my leaving the man there, and causing no one to be sent to overlook or correct what he did,--I descended the notched path with all the speed I could make.

'What is the matter?' I asked the men.

'Signal-man killed this morning, sir.'

'Not the man belonging to that box?'

'Yes, sir.'

'Not the man I know?'

'You will recognise him, sir, if you knew him,' said the man who spoke for the others, solemnly uncovering his own head, and raising an end of the tarpaulin, 'for his face is quite composed.'

'O, how did this happen, how did this happen?' I asked, turning from one to another as the hut closed in again.

'He was cut down by an engine, sir. No man in England knew his work better. But somehow he was not clear of the outer rail. It was just at broad day. He had struck the light, and had the lamp in his hand. As the engine came out of the tunnel, his back was towards her, and she cut him down. That man drove her, and was showing how it happened. Show the gentleman, Tom.'

The man, who wore a rough dark dress, stepped back to his former place at the mouth of the tunnel.

'Coming round the curve in the tunnel, sir,' he said, 'I saw him at the end, like as if I saw him down a perspective-glass. There was no time to check speed, and I knew him to be very careful. As he didn't seem to take heed of the whistle, I shut it off when we were running down upon him, and called to him as loud as I could call.'

'What did you say?'

'I said, 'Below there! Look out! Look out! For God's sake, clear the way!''

I started.

'Ah! it was a dreadful time, sir. I never left off calling to him. I put this arm before my eyes not to see, and I waved this arm to the last; but it was no use.'

Without prolonging the narrative to dwell on any one of its curious circumstances more than on any other, I may, in closing it, point out the coincidence that the warning of the Engine-Driver included, not only the words which the unfortunate Signal-man had repeated to me as haunting him, but also the words which I myself--not he--had attached, and that only in my own mind, to the gesticulation he had imitated.



<-- Previous     |     Next -->

 

Note : Many of our stories have been submitted by guests - if you see anything that should not be here please contact our webmaster.

 

If you found "The Signalman Part-6 by Charles Dickens" enjoyable then have a look at our other Ghost Stories

 
If you would like your story published here send it to: ghost pictures

© Copyright 2009 ghosts.ws